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Build a Shadowbox Privacy Fence

Construction How-To, Fences, Fencing, Outdoor Living May 1, 2009 Matt Weber


Another handy device for setting the posts is the Post-Pod from Cepco Tool. This is a real timesaver for the solo worker. Rather than cut and nail individual braces, the Post-Pod uses precut wood legs secured in a metal collar that grips the post. Just set the Post-Pod over the post hole. Place the post, check for plumb and tighten the Post-Pod collar over the post. Then add the concrete. You can then move the Post-Pod to the next hole without having to cut new braces, or having to remove and reuse the old ones.

As mentioned earlier, The Fast-Setting Concrete from Quikrete couldn’t have been easier to use. However, if you’re using standard concrete that should be premixed, you can mix small batches with a wheelbarrow and shovel or hoe, following the manufacturer’s instructions for the required amount of water. If you have a helper, then another option is to mix and pour with a Crete-Sheet, which eliminates the need for a wheelbarrow and mixing tool.

If you're toe-nailing the fence, then the stringers that follow a slope should be cut at a miter to fit flush between the plumb posts.

If you’re toe-nailing the fence, then the stringers that follow a slope should be cut at a miter to fit flush between the plumb posts.

Allow the posts to set. Once the concrete is hardened, cover it with dirt and slope the earth away from the post to divert water.

Then, run a line of twine from each corner post to the next, keeping the line on the outside face of the posts. Secure the twine tightly. This string will be the placement guide for each of the posts between the corners. Proceed with setting the other posts in the same manner described above. When plumbing the posts, make sure the outside face of the posts lines up exactly with the string in order to keep the posts in a straight line.

A cordless nailer like the paslode model shown is an excellent time and labor saver for any major framing project.

A cordless nailer like the paslode model shown is an excellent time and labor saver for any major framing project.

 

Nailing the Stringers

For this 6-foot tall fence I positioned the bottom stringer 10 inches up from the ground. The other two stringers were evenly spaced 23 inches apart. You may need to alter placement, depending on the height of your fence.

Space the stringers evenly and nail them securely.

Space the stringers evenly and nail them securely.

To prevent repetitive measurements, I made a story pole from a scrap piece of wood. I marked the position of each stinger on the pole with masking tape. I then placed the pole alongside each post and used the tape to determine each stringer location, marking it with pencil.