how to extreme

DIY Homemade Headboard

Bedroom, Construction How-To, Decorating, Projects, Remodeling October 14, 2011 Matt Weber


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By Matt Weber

 

There are hundreds of ways to make a headboard. Here’s one—a custom creation combining style and function.

On some of my home projects, I’m just winging it. Case in point: making a headboard for a bed. According to my wife, a headboard is a crucial decorative element for a bedroom. It was absolutely imperative that we got one. I had never given the matter of headboards much thought, but I’ve since learned that it’s a hot topic for interior designers, with some specialty outlets offering a product line of nothing but headboards in a wide range of materials, sizes and prices.

Most of the headboards I found online range from about $120 to $400, and even higher. You can find headboards made from metal, wood, leather, wood and more. Some styles are strictly decorative, and some are functional with storage shelves.

My wife, Shanna, wanted the headboard colors to harmonize with the bedroom’s chocolate walls and turquoise window and bed dressings. The right tones would provide a splash of color to offset the otherwise dark scheme of the room, but Shanna also wanted the headboard to be upholstered to provide a soft, comfortable headrest for nighttime reading. This combination of features proved difficult to find, so we decided to invent our own.

Plywood Frame

Building this style of headboard is a fairly straightforward project and well within the skill set of the average DIY’er. The backbone of the project is a sheet of 3/4-inch sheathing-grade plywood. We decided that a height of about 22 inches above the surface of the mattress provided adequate room for a headrest. I decided to give it an additional 18 inches of height that extended below the bed surface (behind the mattress and box-spring), so the headrest would look like an integrated component of the bed when viewed from the side. This gave me a full frame height of roughly 40 inches. I made the width of the plywood frame 80 inches—a few inches wider than the width of the king-size mattress. I cross-cut and ripped the plywood to size on a couple of sawhorses, using a circular saw and a straight-edge guide.

Use a circular saw to cut the rough dimensions of the plywood frame.

Use a circular saw to cut the rough dimensions of the plywood frame.

The cuts provided the rough dimensions of the frame, but we wanted to add some scalloped corners to give this basic box shape a little decorative flair. I used a template made from cardboard to create the matching corners.

Mark the midpoint of the headboard on the template.

Mark the midpoint of the headboard on the template.

Cut a cardboard template to the same width as the plywood frame. The height of the template must be large enough to encompass your corner cuts.

Cut a cardboard template to the same width as the plywood frame. The height of the template must be large enough to encompass your corner cuts.

To make the pattern, cut a sheet of cardboard into a rectangle the exact same width as the headboard. The cardboard doesn’t need to be the full height of the headboard, but it must encompass the entire shape of your decorative pattern. Use a pencil to sketch the shape of your accent corner on one side of the cardboard sheet. There’s not necessarily a right or wrong method of determining your corner pattern, but keep an eye on the shape’s visual proportion in relation to the size of the overall headboard. It took me a couple of attempts to draw a contour I was satisfied with. If you’ll be upholstering the headboard, it’s also a good idea to ease the corners with sloped curves rather than sharp angles that risk cutting through the fabric over time. Once you’re happy with the shape, trace the final pattern with a marker to distinguish it from the other pencil marks of your earlier attempts.

Cut out the corner shapes, cutting both sides of the template to match.

Cut out the corner shapes, cutting both sides of the template to match.

Fold the template in half, aligning the edges and taping together. Draw you accent corners on the template.

Fold the template in half, aligning the edges and taping together. Draw you accent corners on the template.

Fold the cardboard sheet in half so the edges are perfectly flush. Tape the folds together so it doesn’t slip. Use a utility knife to cut both halves of the folded cardboard, following your marked pattern. When you unfold the cut cardboard, you will have a symmetrical template.

Unfold the template and tape it to the plywood, then trace the corner shapes onto the plywood.

Unfold the template and tape it to the plywood, then trace the corner shapes onto the plywood.

Tape the template to the plywood, with the top and sides flush. Trace the template onto the corners of the plywood, and cut out the shapes along the marked lines with a jigsaw.

A circular saw with a straight-edge guide is an accurate system for trimming the frame to its desired height.

A circular saw with a straight-edge guide is an accurate system for trimming the frame to its desired height.

Use a jigsaw to cut out the corner accent shapes.

Use a jigsaw to cut out the corner accent shapes.