how to extreme

How to Make an Outdoor Firewood Organizer

Construction How-To, Lumber and Composite, Outdoor Living August 10, 2016 Sonia


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By Mark Clement

Anyone who knows me or watches MyFixitUpLife on YouTube might’ve heard me discuss this: I’m not a big fan of piles.

The pile system for anything—tools, toiletries, kids’ toys—really rankles my mojo.

We cannot have rankled mojo now, can we?

Things that are off the ground and within reach work better. They’re easier to get, easier to use, easier to put away. Things trapped in the bottoms of bins or boxes are harder to use. I am not anal or OCD; I am in a hurry.

Plus, if I’m going to waste my time, I want to waste it on my own terms. I prefer wasting it on Facebook fail videos or reading an actual book or riding my bike—not breaking my knuckles wrestling a log out of a box.

This mojo is the source code for my firewood organizer design.

I want to enjoy the fire, not fight with the logs or have a pile of ants crawling around under a heap of firewood on my deck. I want to listen to the crackle, not muck around in bark. I want my house to look like I care about it. The former owner (pretty sure the old hag haunts the place from time to time) would probably like it, too.

So here’s how I made it.

Design

I designed this project to store firewood, kindling and related supplies outdoors but near the house—on a porch, for example.

Or near the backyard fire pit, which is where this one lives.

I also designed it to be off the ground so wood can stay reasonably dry and out of the snow and other weather. And, if I want to sweep or blow the debris away from it periodically, I can.

Finally, I designed it to look cool. So you’re not just looking at a hunk of sticks and brackets, but a skillfully assembled shape. It is made from five 2x12x12 pressure-treated Southern Yellow Pine boards, exterior screws and some miter-saw magic.

How-To

It’s not impossible to make this with a circular saw, but the miters might suffer somewhat. I used my 12-inch slide compound miter saw to mac-daddy these miters.

Math is nice. Reality is nicer. Sometimes a few scrapes cut to size can help you visualize how big-or not big enough-something is and how well it might fit the intended location.

Math is nice. Reality is nicer. Sometimes a few scrapes cut to size can help you visualize how big-or not big enough-something is and how well it might fit the intended location.

While you could scale the dimensions for this up or down, each piece of the octagon in this project is 20-inches long. (Make a test piece to help visualize scale).

Accurately measuring and cutting eight identical pieces is "Level 1000 Unlikely." It's easier to make one piece and use it ot mark the others, so all you do with the next pieces is slide them to a line.

Accurately measuring and cutting eight identical pieces is “Level 1000 Unlikely.” It’s easier to make one piece and use it ot mark the others, so all you do with the next pieces is slide them to a line.